The Daintree

Home to over 12,000 insect species, snakes, spiders and crocodiles, The Daintree rainforest is as 'Aussie' as an Australian adventure gets. Four days of good times, steep dusty climbs & frosty Milton mangoes in far north Queensland #OYRdaintree

GRAVEL GRIND ADVENTURE

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PART I - THE CREB TRACK. 
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PART II - THE BLOOMFIELD TRACK. 
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MAPS & INFORMATION.  
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Rider Roster

BEARDY

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ESJAY

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DAN

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BEN

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ALICE

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BONICH

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DAYS

4

DISTANCE

380km

ELEVATION

5662m

OFF-ROAD

60%

Pub Trivia Knowledge


Situated north of Cairns in Queensland, the Daintree is the largest continuous area of tropical rainforest in Australia, and one of the country’s most popular tourist destinations. Named after Richard Daintree, who pioneered the use of photography in geological field work in the area, it is one of the most complex ecosystems on earth.


The Daintree rainforest is a critical ecological hub, containing over 12,000 species of insects, 90% of Australia’s bat and butterfly species and 12 of the planet’s 19 primitive flowering plant families - all on less than 0.1% of Australia’s landmass. The Daintree is a lasting reminder of a time when Australia was humid with plentiful rainfall (Uluru was once encased in a rainforest). You can still find flora with direct ancestors that date back over 110 million years. In fact, the discovery of the ‘idot fruit’ (one of the rarest and most primitive of the flowering plants on the planet) in the Daintree in 1970 is arguably Australia’s most significant botanical find.


The Cairns Regional Electricity Board (CREB) track is a very steep and very rough track linking the town of Daintree to the Bloomfield track near Wujal Wujal. Following ancient Aboriginal foot trails and made redundant by the Bloomfield track (which is closer to the coast), the CREB track is now a popular destination for experienced 4WD and dirt bike riders (with the occasional adventure or touring cyclist thrown in for good measure). Famous for its brutal (often impassable) terrain, red clay appearance and access to Roaring Meg Falls (a sacred Aboriginal women’s site), it is closed for most of the year and attempted only at your own risk. Our kind of place.


Our Through The Daintree adventure was supported by a trusty 4WD, meaning we carried only our photographic gear and essentials on the bikes. For this adventure we camped at various camping grounds along the CREB and Bloomfield tracks. You can read more about our equipment and approach in the Road Book.

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Over Yonder is adventure by bicycle - and cyclocross racing on the side. Curated for travellers, explorers & outdoor aficionados. Brought to you by a thirst for the unknown.

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